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= Upgrading Alpine =
+
This page covers upgrading to a newer releases.
  
This document describes how to replace an Alpine installation with a newer version.
+
Doing regular security updates with the package manager is shown at [[Alpine_Linux_package_management#Upgrade_a_Running_System|Upgrading a running system]].
  
The upgrade process consist of the following steps:
 
* Backup current setup
 
* Upgrade Alpine CD/USB
 
* Execute upgrade script
 
* Save changes
 
* Reboot
 
  
== Backing up current config ==
 
Its recommended to make a backup of your config before you start.<BR>
 
The idea is to save the (*apkovl*) from your media to a safe place.<BR>
 
If you need to rollback, simply revert to your old *apkovl.tar.gz*.
 
  
=== Backing up to media ===
 
You could replace the existing floppy with a new (dos-formatted) floppy and then run the command:
 
lbu ci floppy
 
  
Or you could use a USB to store your configuration.
 
lbu ci usb
 
  
== Download new Alpine ==
+
{{Warning|Before continuing to update your system, make sure that you have a backup of your important data.}}
[http://wiki.alpinelinux.org/w/index.php?title=Downloads Download] latest ISO image (or USB image).
+
== Upgrading an Alpine Linux Hard-disk installation ==
  
=== Upgrade CD media ===
+
=== Upgrading Alpine v2.x to v3.x ===
Burn the ISO on a blank CD and replace the existing CD with the new.
 
/etc/init.d/modloop stop
 
eject
 
Now you should insert the new media.
 
/etc/init.d/modloop start
 
  
=== Upgrade USB media ===
+
{{Warning|Alpine Linux 3.x switched to a different libc implementation compared to previous versions. Because the new Musl libc is not ABI compatible with uClibc, there are additional steps required for an upgrade.}}
On USB installations you can just download and unpack the latest tar directly to ''/media/usb''.
 
$ wget -C /media/usb -q -O - \
 
      http://distrib-coffee.ipsl.jussieu.fr/pub/linux/alpine/alpine/v1.7/usbdrive/alpine-1.7.22-i386.tar.gz \
 
      | tar -zvx
 
  
== Execute upgrade script ==
+
==== Installing statically linked tools ====
The new media has a ''upgrade'' script found on root level on media (/media/cdrom/upgrade or /media/usb/upgrade).<BR>
 
Start by executing this script (in our example below we use CD media).
 
/media/cdrom/upgrade
 
  
=== Example on how a upgrade could look ===
+
Statically linked version of apk-tools is needed, because the old musl version would stop working after a libc change (possibly in the middle of upgrade). Static version of busybox can be handy in case of the recovery from a failure.
Before actually upgrading packages it will get an overview what packages will be upgraded.<BR>
 
It migh look something like this:
 
<pre>~ $ /media/usb/upgrade
 
Upgrading from alpine-1.7.2 to alpine-1.7.6
 
Will try to upgrade packages from
 
fetching usb://apks/INDEX.md5.gz
 
Looking for new packages...
 
The following packages will be updated:
 
alpine-baselayout-1.4.1-r1          <  needs updating (index has 1.6.0)
 
alpine-conf-0.9                    <  needs updating (index has 1.0)
 
busybox-1.5.0-r1                    <  needs updating (index has 1.7.1)
 
  
Press Enter to continue or Ctrl-c to abort.
+
{{Cmd|apk add busybox-static apk-tools-static}}
</pre>
 
  
Verify that it looks ok and press [''enter''] to start the upgrade.
+
==== Changing repositories to v3.x ====
  
As a first step the upgrade script will try to upgrade apk-tools, uclibc and busybox.<BR>
+
To begin, you need to update your {{Path|/etc/apk/repositories}} file. Here are some shortcuts for doing so:
Then it will upgrade all packages by running'' 'apk_add -u'''.<BR>
+
:* Launch {{Cmd|setup-apkrepos}} Enter {{Key|e}} to edit {{Path|/etc/apk/repositories}}. Change the version number by hand.
It will look something like this:
+
:* Or, edit the file in place. This is how you'd change <var>v2.7</var> to <var>v3.0</var>: {{Cmd|sed -i -e 's/<var>v2\.7</var>/<var>v3.0</var>/g' /etc/apk/repositories}}
<pre>fetching usb://apks/busybox-1.7.1.apk
 
updating busybox-1.5.0-r1 to busybox-1.7.1
 
fetching usb://apks/alpine-baselayout-1.6.0.apk
 
updating alpine-baselayout-1.4.1-r1 to alpine-baselayout-1.6.0
 
fetching usb://apks/alpine-conf-1.0.apk
 
updating alpine-conf-0.9 to alpine-conf-1.0
 
</pre>
 
  
When then'' 'apk_add' ''application upgrades packages, it will detect that you have modified some config files.<BR>
+
==== Upgrading system ====
Instead of overwriting your config, it will install the new config with the suffix'' '.apk-new'''.<BR>
 
This way you are able to review and merge in changes from the default config to your own config file.<BR>
 
Config files that are untouched will just silently be replaced.
 
  
The'' 'upgrade' ''script will execute'' 'update-conf' ''to assist you in merging the config files.<BR>
+
Use statically linked version of apk to update content of repository:
It will first display a list of config files that you will need to take care of manually.<BR>
 
Like this:
 
<pre>The following config files have been updated and need attention:
 
/etc/profile
 
/etc/modules
 
/etc/inittab
 
/etc/hosts
 
/etc/init.d/syslog
 
/etc/init.d/networking
 
/etc/init.d/modloop
 
</pre>
 
  
Afterward it will step through every file, displaying a diff and give you options to act:
+
{{Cmd|apk.static update}}
<pre>
 
--- /etc/profile        2007-05-31 14:11:47 +0000
 
+++ /etc/profile.apk-new        2007-09-07 06:33:36 +0000
 
@@ -1,4 +1,3 @@
 
export PATH=/usr/local/bin:/usr/bin:/bin:/usr/local/sbin:/usr/sbin:/sbin
 
export PAGER=less
 
umask 022
 
-export LBU_MEDIA=usb
 
New /etc/profile available:
 
Quit, Next, Show diff, Edit new, Zap new, Use new (q/n/s/e/z/u) [s]:
 
</pre>
 
  
In this case we have added'' 'export LBU_MEDIA=usb' ''so we don't need to specify the media to'' 'lbu'''.<BR>
+
Simulating upgrade is recommended in order to detect issues beforehand:
We want to keep our current file as it is so we just press'' 'z' ''(and [''enter'']) to zap the new config and keep the old.
 
Next is file is'' '/etc/modules''':
 
<pre>
 
--- /etc/modules        2007-05-09 16:02:31 +0000
 
+++ /etc/modules.apk-new        2007-09-07 06:33:36 +0000
 
@@ -1,4 +1,2 @@
 
deadline-iosched
 
af_packet
 
-xt_state
 
-xt_tcpudp
 
New /etc/modules available:
 
Quit, Next, Show diff, Edit new, Zap new, Use new (q/n/s/e/z/u) [s]:  
 
</pre>
 
  
Also here we just keep the current config by pressing'' 'z' ''since the modules are needed for our ipsec.
+
{{Cmd|apk.static upgrade --no-self-upgrade --available --simulate}}
  
Next file is'' '/etc/inittab''':
+
With no problems encountered or after resolving them, start proper upgrade:
<pre>--- /etc/inittab        2007-06-20 13:21:20 +0000
 
+++ /etc/inittab.apk-new        2007-09-07 06:33:36 +0000
 
@@ -4,7 +4,7 @@
 
::wait:/etc/init.d/rcL
 
 
# Set up a couple of getty's
 
-::respawn:/sbin/cttyhack /sbin/getty - 9600 vt100
 
+::respawn:/usr/bin/cttyhack /sbin/getty - 9600 vt100
 
tty2::respawn:/sbin/getty 38400 tty2
 
tty3::respawn:/sbin/getty 38400 tty3
 
tty4::respawn:/sbin/getty 38400 tty4
 
New /etc/inittab available:
 
Quit, Next, Show diff, Edit new, Zap new, Use new (q/n/s/e/z/u) [s]:  
 
</pre>
 
  
This time the change is not caused by us, but its a change in the default config.<BR>
+
{{Cmd|apk.static upgrade --no-self-upgrade --available}}
This is even related to where the login screen should appear so if we dont merge this change, we might not be able to see the login screen!<BR>
 
We choose'' 'u' ''to use the new config.
 
  
Continue go through every config file.<BR>
+
=== Upgrading to latest release ===
Sometimes you might want to edit the new file, or leave the upgrade process to take care of the config file manually by using option'' 'q'''.<BR>
+
{{:Include:Upgrading to latest release}}
You can always resume later by either running the'' 'upgrade' ''script again or by executing'' 'update-conf -i'''.
 
  
== Save changes ==
+
=== Upgrading to Edge ===
Now that all upgrades are done, we should save our settings to our media (which you hopefully have backed up).
+
{{:Include:Upgrading to Edge}}
lbu ci floppy
 
  
== Rebooting ==
+
=== Upgrading from older versions ===
In most cases you will need to reboot Alpine (specially if there are changes in the kernel):
+
 
kill 1
+
See [[Upgrading from older versions]].
'''''Note:''' If you know what you are doing, you might not need to reboot.<BR>But make sure that all services affected by the upgrade are restarted.''
+
 
 +
== Upgrading Alpine Linux on CD ==
 +
 
 +
You may have an installation where the boot media being used (such as a CD, for example) is separate from the media used to store the configuration information. In this case, simply download the latest ISO, and replace the boot media contents with the contents of the latest ISO. If you are booting from a CD, this would simply mean replacing the CD with a CD made from the new image and rebooting the Alpine Linux box.
 +
 
 +
=== Update remaining packages from Web repository ===
 +
 
 +
If you are using [[How_to_enable_APK_caching|APK caching]] you should also perform the following steps.
 +
{{:Include:Using_Internet_Repositories_for_apk-tools}}
 +
 
 +
If you're upgrading from a version of Alpine before 2.3.0_rc1, ensure you have the latest available version of the Alpine Linux Package Manager first before upgrading anything else:
 +
{{Cmd|apk add --upgrade apk-tools}}
 +
 
 +
Next, upgrade all your packages:
 +
 
 +
{{Cmd|apk upgrade --available
 +
sync}}
 +
 
 +
The <code>--available</code> switch is used to force all packages to be upgraded, even if they have the same version numbers. Sometimes changes in uClibc require doing this.
 +
 
 +
After upgrading packages, save any configuration changes (you should have backed up your earlier configuration prior to upgrading).
 +
{{Cmd|lbu ci}}
 +
 
 +
 
 +
== Upgrading Alpine Linux on other removable media (such as CF/USB) ==
 +
 
 +
The following instructions are for run-from-RAM Alpine installations running on Compact Flash or USB media. Updating your repositories using [[#Upgrading_an_Alpine_Linux_Hard-disk_installation|the procedures detailed above]], then running:
 +
{{Cmd|apk upgrade --update-cache --available}}
 +
will suffice for some purposes. (If you want the new packages to be used after a reboot, you should [[How_to_enable_APK_caching|enable APK caching]].)
 +
 
 +
However, this is not an adequate general solution because it won't honor any kernel upgrades and the like. For the general solution, you'll need to upgrade your boot medium (Compact Flash or USB). That is what the following steps describe how to do.
 +
 
 +
{{:Include:Upgrading_Alpine_environmentvars}}
 +
 
 +
=== Upgrade Operating System ===
 +
 
 +
Start by checking that you have enough space on your media. For a '''standard''' Alpine image, you need at least 400MB available space.
 +
{{Cmd|df -h {{!}} grep "Filesystem\{{!}}$LBU_MEDIA"}}
 +
 
 +
==== Download and verify new release ====
 +
 
 +
Make sure the media that holds your Alpine system is mounted readwrite.
 +
{{Cmd|mount -oremount,rw /media/$LBU_MEDIA}}
 +
 
 +
'''If using Alpine Linux 2.2.3 or newer''': use the following command to download, mount and copy files as needed for you: {{Cmd|setup-bootable -u http://dl-cdn.alpinelinux.org/alpine/latest-stable/release/<arch>/<image>.iso /media/$LBU_MEDIA}} Once the command completes, proceed to the [[#Save changes|Save changes]] section.
 +
 
 +
==== For older versions of Alpine ====
 +
Start downloading a new '.iso' and a '.sha1' file
 +
{{Cmd|cd /media/$LBU_MEDIA
 +
wget -c {{#latestalp:alpine|url}}
 +
wget {{#latestalp:alpine|url}}.sha1}}
 +
 
 +
Check integrity of the downloaded files ''(it might take some time)'':
 +
{{Cmd|sha1sum -c {{#latestalp:alpine|file}}.sha1}}
 +
''The output of the above command should say 'OK'.<BR>''
 +
''If says 'FAILED', delete the iso file and download it again.''
 +
 
 +
'''If using Alpine Linux 1.10.4 or newer''': there is a tool ''setup-bootable'' that will mount and copy the image you just downloaded to your boot medium. With this tool simply do: {{Cmd|setup-bootable -u {{#latestalp:alpine|file}} /media/$LBU_MEDIA}}
 +
 
 +
[[Upgrading from older versions#Upgrading_a_removable_medium_from_Alpine_before_1.10.4|Instructions for older versions of Alpine]] are located elsewhere.
 +
 
 +
=== Save changes ===
 +
Now that all upgrades are done, we should save our settings to our media (which you hopefully have backed up prior to doing this upgrade).
 +
{{Cmd|lbu ci}}
 +
 
 +
=== Load new kernel ===
 +
In most cases you will need to reboot Alpine Linux (especially if there are changes in the kernel):
 +
{{Cmd|sync
 +
reboot}}
 +
 
 +
{{Note|If you know what you are doing, you might not need to reboot. But make sure that all services affected by the upgrade are restarted.}}
 +
 
 +
=== Update remaining packages from Web repository ===
 +
If you are using [[How_to_enable_APK_caching|APK caching]] you should follow the instructions to [[#Update_remaining_packages_from_Web_repository|Update remaining packages from Web repository]], above.
 +
 
 +
 
 +
[[Category:Installation]]
 +
[[Category:Package Manager]]

Latest revision as of 12:32, 27 May 2020

This page covers upgrading to a newer releases.

Doing regular security updates with the package manager is shown at Upgrading a running system.



Tango-dialog-warning.png
Warning: Before continuing to update your system, make sure that you have a backup of your important data.


Upgrading an Alpine Linux Hard-disk installation

Upgrading Alpine v2.x to v3.x

Tango-dialog-warning.png
Warning: Alpine Linux 3.x switched to a different libc implementation compared to previous versions. Because the new Musl libc is not ABI compatible with uClibc, there are additional steps required for an upgrade.


Installing statically linked tools

Statically linked version of apk-tools is needed, because the old musl version would stop working after a libc change (possibly in the middle of upgrade). Static version of busybox can be handy in case of the recovery from a failure.

apk add busybox-static apk-tools-static

Changing repositories to v3.x

To begin, you need to update your /etc/apk/repositories file. Here are some shortcuts for doing so:

  • Launch

    setup-apkrepos

    Enter e to edit /etc/apk/repositories. Change the version number by hand.
  • Or, edit the file in place. This is how you'd change v2.7 to v3.0:

    sed -i -e 's/v2\.7/v3.0/g' /etc/apk/repositories

Upgrading system

Use statically linked version of apk to update content of repository:

apk.static update

Simulating upgrade is recommended in order to detect issues beforehand:

apk.static upgrade --no-self-upgrade --available --simulate

With no problems encountered or after resolving them, start proper upgrade:

apk.static upgrade --no-self-upgrade --available

Upgrading to latest release

When Alpine Linux is installed to hard drive, upgrading to a newer stable version is straightforward.

To begin, you need to update your /etc/apk/repositories file. Here are some shortcuts for doing so:


Or you could do this manually: Edit the /etc/apk/repositories file using an editor (nano for instance) and if necessary, add references to the Alpine package repositories. In the example below, the reference to the Alpine CD is maintained, so that if the requested package is available on the local media, it will be obtained from there instead of being downloaded from the remote repository:

Contents of /etc/apk/repositories

/media/cdrom/apks http://dl-3.alpinelinux.org/alpine/v3.3/main

Another example: upgrading from version 3.3 to 3.4 simply change:

http://dl-3.alpinelinux.org/alpine/v3.3/main

to

 http://dl-3.alpinelinux.org/alpine/v3.4/main

Thus, the file will now look like this:

Contents of /etc/apk/repositories

/media/cdrom/apks http://dl-3.alpinelinux.org/alpine/v3.4/main
Note: Starting with version 3.3, there is a new repository called community. Many packages have been moved from the main repository to community to indicate that they are not guaranteed to be supported beyond six months. If you are using any of these packages, be sure to add the community repository. For example: http://dl-3.alpinelinux.org/alpine/v3.3/community

Only one repository is shown above; however, you may also replace http://dl-3.alpinelinux.org/alpine/ with any of the mirrors from: http://rsync.alpinelinux.org/alpine/MIRRORS.txt

After updating the repositories file, obtain the latest index of available packages:

apk update

Tip: Adding the -U/--update-cache to another apk command, as in apk add -U ... or apk upgrade -U, has the same effect as running apk update before the other apk command.

If you're upgrading from a version of Alpine before 2.3.0_rc1, ensure you have the latest available version of the Alpine Linux Package Manager first before upgrading anything else:

apk add --upgrade apk-tools

Next, upgrade all your packages:

apk upgrade --available

The --available switch is used to force all packages to be upgraded, even if they have the same version numbers. Sometimes changes in uClibc require doing this.

Note: You will need to restart any services that have been upgraded to begin using the upgraded versions. If the kernel is upgraded, you will need to reboot to begin using the upgraded version:

sync reboot

Upgrading to Edge

An upgrade of Alpine Linux from a stable version to the rolling development version, edge can be done in a few simple steps. (These instructions assume that Alpine Linux is installed to a hard drive, rather than run-from-RAM.)

To begin, you need to update your /etc/apk/repositories file. Here are some shortcuts for doing so:

  • Launch

    setup-apkrepos

    Enter e to edit /etc/apk/repositories. Change the version number (such as v3.2) to edge.
  • Or, edit the file in place:

    sed -i -e 's/v[[:digit:]]\..*\//edge\//g' /etc/apk/repositories

The result should look like this:

Contents of /etc/apk/repositories

... http://dl-3.alpinelinux.org/alpine/edge/main


Next, upgrade all your packages in one shot:

apk upgrade --update-cache --available

The --available switch is used to force all packages to be upgraded, even if they have the same version numbers. Sometimes changes in musl-libc have required doing this.

Note: You will need to restart any services that have been upgraded to begin using the upgraded versions. If the kernel is upgraded, you will need to reboot to begin using the upgraded version:

sync reboot

To check your current release:

cat /etc/alpine-release

You will see the build date attached to the release.

Upgrading from older versions

See Upgrading from older versions.

Upgrading Alpine Linux on CD

You may have an installation where the boot media being used (such as a CD, for example) is separate from the media used to store the configuration information. In this case, simply download the latest ISO, and replace the boot media contents with the contents of the latest ISO. If you are booting from a CD, this would simply mean replacing the CD with a CD made from the new image and rebooting the Alpine Linux box.

Update remaining packages from Web repository

If you are using APK caching you should also perform the following steps. Edit the /etc/apk/repositories file using an editor (nano for instance) and if necessary, add references to the Alpine package repositories. In the example below, the reference to the Alpine CD is maintained, so that if the requested package is available on the local media, it will be obtained from there instead of being downloaded from the remote repository:

Contents of /etc/apk/repositories

/media/cdrom/apks http://dl-3.alpinelinux.org/alpine/v3.3/main

Another example: upgrading from version 3.3 to 3.4 simply change:

http://dl-3.alpinelinux.org/alpine/v3.3/main

to

 http://dl-3.alpinelinux.org/alpine/v3.4/main

Thus, the file will now look like this:

Contents of /etc/apk/repositories

/media/cdrom/apks http://dl-3.alpinelinux.org/alpine/v3.4/main
Note: Starting with version 3.3, there is a new repository called community. Many packages have been moved from the main repository to community to indicate that they are not guaranteed to be supported beyond six months. If you are using any of these packages, be sure to add the community repository. For example: http://dl-3.alpinelinux.org/alpine/v3.3/community

Only one repository is shown above; however, you may also replace http://dl-3.alpinelinux.org/alpine/ with any of the mirrors from: http://rsync.alpinelinux.org/alpine/MIRRORS.txt

After updating the repositories file, obtain the latest index of available packages:

apk update

Tip: Adding the -U/--update-cache to another apk command, as in apk add -U ... or apk upgrade -U, has the same effect as running apk update before the other apk command.

If you're upgrading from a version of Alpine before 2.3.0_rc1, ensure you have the latest available version of the Alpine Linux Package Manager first before upgrading anything else:

apk add --upgrade apk-tools

Next, upgrade all your packages:

apk upgrade --available sync

The --available switch is used to force all packages to be upgraded, even if they have the same version numbers. Sometimes changes in uClibc require doing this.

After upgrading packages, save any configuration changes (you should have backed up your earlier configuration prior to upgrading).

lbu ci


Upgrading Alpine Linux on other removable media (such as CF/USB)

The following instructions are for run-from-RAM Alpine installations running on Compact Flash or USB media. Updating your repositories using the procedures detailed above, then running:

apk upgrade --update-cache --available

will suffice for some purposes. (If you want the new packages to be used after a reboot, you should enable APK caching.)

However, this is not an adequate general solution because it won't honor any kernel upgrades and the like. For the general solution, you'll need to upgrade your boot medium (Compact Flash or USB). That is what the following steps describe how to do.

Setup environment variables

To make the documentation a bit more "generic" we start by setting some environment variables.

vi /etc/lbu/lbu.conf

Make sure that the variable LBU_MEDIA is not commented (by removing the leading '#').

You also need to set a appropriate value for your LBU_MEDIA. The media you choose will be the media where you store your settings/configuration.

Note: Even if you have you alpine installed on CF, HD or USB you can still choose to save your config on some other media that suits your needs. But remember that both the media where you have your Alpine system AND the media where you have your config need to be in your box when booting it.

Examples:

LBU_MEDIA=usb

or:

LBU_MEDIA=sda1

Now that you have your /etc/lbu/lbu.conf configured for your needs, we will set the environment variables (note the leading .).

. /etc/lbu/lbu.conf

You can test if your environment variable was set:

echo $LBU_MEDIA

It should output something like usb, sda1, or whatever you just configured.

Back up your config

Before starting to upgrade, it's wise to save your configuration.

lbu ci

Upgrade Operating System

Start by checking that you have enough space on your media. For a standard Alpine image, you need at least 400MB available space.

df -h | grep "Filesystem\|$LBU_MEDIA"

Download and verify new release

Make sure the media that holds your Alpine system is mounted readwrite.

mount -oremount,rw /media/$LBU_MEDIA

If using Alpine Linux 2.2.3 or newer: use the following command to download, mount and copy files as needed for you:

setup-bootable -u http://dl-cdn.alpinelinux.org/alpine/latest-stable/release/<arch>/<image>.iso /media/$LBU_MEDIA

Once the command completes, proceed to the Save changes section.

For older versions of Alpine

Start downloading a new '.iso' and a '.sha1' file

cd /media/$LBU_MEDIA wget -c {{#latestalp:alpine|url}} wget {{#latestalp:alpine|url}}.sha1

Check integrity of the downloaded files (it might take some time):

sha1sum -c {{#latestalp:alpine|file}}.sha1

The output of the above command should say 'OK'.
If says 'FAILED', delete the iso file and download it again.

If using Alpine Linux 1.10.4 or newer: there is a tool setup-bootable that will mount and copy the image you just downloaded to your boot medium. With this tool simply do:

setup-bootable -u {{#latestalp:alpine|file}} /media/$LBU_MEDIA

Instructions for older versions of Alpine are located elsewhere.

Save changes

Now that all upgrades are done, we should save our settings to our media (which you hopefully have backed up prior to doing this upgrade).

lbu ci

Load new kernel

In most cases you will need to reboot Alpine Linux (especially if there are changes in the kernel):

sync reboot

Note: If you know what you are doing, you might not need to reboot. But make sure that all services affected by the upgrade are restarted.

Update remaining packages from Web repository

If you are using APK caching you should follow the instructions to Update remaining packages from Web repository, above.