Configure OpenLDAP

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(Last edited by Dhorton on 4 May 2022.)

Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) is often employed as an authentication mechanism, providing a common username and password across many different applications. This tutorial shows how to install and configure the OpenLDAP package on Alpine Linux.

Installing Packages

There is an Alpine package for OpenLDAP. However, apk add openldap is not enough to get you up and running. You'll also need to install a backend database and some LDAP command-line tools.

Here's how:

 apk add openldap openldap-back-mdb openldap-clients

Customizing Configuration for OpenLDAP 2.3+

The Alpine OpenLDAP package can use either a configuration directory (slapd.d) or a configuration file (slapd.conf). Since OpenLDAP 2.3, the preferred method is to use the slapd.d configuration directory and any official OpenLDAP documentation, including their quickstart guide, will use this configuration method.

In this section, you'll make changes to use the slapd.d configuration directory.

 install -m 755 -o ldap -g ldap -d /etc/openldap/slapd.d
 vi /etc/conf.d/slapd

Comment out cfgfile="/etc/openldap/slapd.conf"

Uncomment cfgdir="/etc/openldap/slapd.d"

 rm /etc/openldap/slapd.conf
 vi /etc/openldap/slapd.ldif

Updating Shared Libraries Filenames

Open up /etc/openldap/slapd.ldif in your favorite editor. Search for the filenames ending with .la and change the extension to .so

Or, you can do...

 sed -i s/\.la$/.so/g slapd.ldif

Customizing Configuration for Your Domain

Edit slapd.ldif again.

 Find olcSuffix:
 Change to match your domain
 
 Find olcRootDN: 
 Change to match your domain

Or you can do...

 sed -i s/dc=my-domain,dc=com/dc=home/g /etc/openldap/slapd.ldif

Import the Configuration

Use this command:

 slapadd -n 0 -F /etc/openldap/slapd.d -l /etc/openldap/slapd.ldif

There should be no errors, only a "Closing DB..." message.

Change ownership on the files or the slapd service will refuse to start.

 chown -R ldap:ldap /etc/openldap/slapd.d/*

Configuring the slapd Service

The pid directory is missing. We'll need to create it or the service won't start.

 install -m 755 -o ldap -g ldap -d /var/lib/openldap/run
 

Testing

ldapsearch -x -b -s base '(objectclass=*)' namingContexts

You should see your domain.

You can also test with `slapcat -n 0` This will dump the entire config database in LDIF format. Combine with grep to search for your domain.

>When using grep, remember LDAP uses the format dc=domain,dc=com and not the more familiar domain.com.

Reference

https://openldap.org/doc/admin26/quickstart.html